Wellness for Professional and Personal Practice

Broadcast on May 10, 2019
Presenter, Peggy Swarbrick, PhD, FAOTA

Working in the helping field can be rewarding though our commitment to others can impact our daily occupations including overall wellness in 8 dimensions including the physical domain. This webinar reviewed the basics of wellness self- care, and the strategies that promote balance and satisfaction in the physical domains. Participants considered factors that interfere with overall wellness.  Peer Recovery Supporters and Community Health Workers were able to identify strategies to use personally or professionally that support well-being.  Strategies that can be incorporated into daily routines were reviewed.

Resources and tools for personal practice and those that can be shared with persons served were provided. By the end of viewing the webinar, you will be able to:

  • Define wellness self-care
  • Consider how wellness self-care skills can promote satisfaction with work and personal life.
  • Examine tools for self-reflection and self-care
  • Identify factors that interfere with wellness self-care
  • Access tools and strategies for personal and professional practice

 This webinar also explored the concept of burnout and self-care as a preventative measure and recovery tool for avoiding work burnout.  Overall, participants were empowered to both prevent and manage their wellness and convey said approach to their respective clients.

 

Peggy Swarbrick, Ph.D., FAOTA is an adjunct Associate Professor and Director of Practice Innovation and Wellness, Rutgers and Wellness Institute Coordinator at Collaborative Support Programs of New Jersey.  Dr. Swarbrick worked many years an occupational therapist in a variety of settings providing wellness and recovery focused services. She has been involved in related research and dissemination activities.  She has numerous publications and has lectured on issues such as health promotion, wellness, employment, peer delivered models, and recovery. She earned a doctorate from New York University.